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Ghostbusters

What’s there to like?

There’s been so much political back and forth about this Ghostbusters remake with women in the lead roles, I was a little gun shy to weigh in. To my relief, I found the feminist angle fairly unremarkable in terms of how much I enjoyed the movie. I hope it’s not especially controversial to say the women didn’t distract me with their womanity–nor did they necessarily bring much in the way of extra movie punch. For me, no big deal either way.

I’m also a sucker for throwback cameos. Pretty much every relevant actor from the old version showed up in a (mostly) low key way that still made me smile.

Oh, I should also mention that Kate McKinnon was rather weirdly brilliant. Or brilliantly weird. Something like that. Anyway, her performance might be the best thing here.

What’s not to like?

While Ghostbusters‘s politics ended up modest, so too did the movie. I don’t have any massive complaints, but I did find the movie’s action and humor lacking for, you know, an action comedy. There were few laughs in the theater when I saw it. Mostly it felt like we were constantly trying to stay ready to find something funny but usually missing out on the payoff.

I admit it’s probably unfair for me to mentally compare this movie to the 1980s one. I haven’t seen the original for decades, and back then it was one of those movies my brother and I would watch over and over again as kids. So I’m sure I have more nostalgic affection for the old one than it deserves cinematically. Still, the new Ghostbusters felt watered down and unremarkable. I can see people feeling differently without the biases I bring to the table, but there you go. I has hoping for a bit more, and I left slightly disappointed.

The Verdict

For all the outside hoopla surrounding Ghostbusters, ultimately it’s a rather ordinary, ho hum flick that’s not bad but not great.

Fine

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Star Trek Beyond, The Witcher 3: Blood and Wine, Ghostbusters, Weekend Picks

It’s Star Trek Beyond week! How differently will fans and nonfans like this one? How does it compare with other Trek flicks?

Bob mini reviews The Witcher 3: Blood and Wine. Logan hits up Ghostbusters.

In weekend picks, Logan talks about MadTV and Tallulah. Bob mentions Bad Mom and Nerve, but picks Jason Bourne for next week’s full review.

Let’s rock!

Follow us on Twitter: @LoganBeaux and @BobCaswell

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Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates, Veep, Inside, Seven Days in Hell, Weekend Picks

We know you’ve been putting off seeing Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates until you had our take, so here you go. Can this cast carry a good comedy? Does the R-rated raunch help or hurt?

Logan and Bob also jointly mini-review the latest season of Veep. Bob’s got a couple more, and talks about Inside and Seven Days in Hell.

For weekend picks, Logan mentions Mr. Robot, Suits, Ballers, and Vice Principals. Bob talks Ghostbusters, The Infiltrator, and Cafe Society. BUT, we’re taking the week off next week, so there’s no official pick. You’re on your own. We believe in you.

Let’s rock!

Follow us on Twitter: @LoganBeaux and @BobCaswell

 

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Swiss Army Man, Zootopia, The Neon Demon, The Beginning of Life, Hearts of Iron IV, Parenthood, Weekend Picks

With Logan and Bob absorbing so much this week, a mini-review extravaganza seemed like the right way to go.

Logan talks Swiss Army Man, The Neon Demon, and the video game Hearts of Iron IV.

Bob brings you Zootopia, The Beginning of Life, and Parenthood season 4.

In weekend picks, Logan mentions Tyrant and The Night Of. Bob half-heartedly mentions Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates, The Secret Life of Pets, and Captain Fantastic, but can’t decide if he wants to see any of them. Watch Twitter for his final pick.

Let’s rock!

Follow us on Twitter: @LoganBeaux and @BobCaswell

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The Neon Demon

What’s there to like?

Before anything else, it’s important to note that The Neon Demon is one of those artsy(-fartsy), experimental films that takes itself rather seriously. A lot of people aren’t into that. I get it.

BUT, I often get a kick out of movies like this, and I found Nicolas Winding Refn’s current flick fascinating. It’s about the connection between vulnerability and beauty, and simultaneously, paradoxically, between beauty and power. (Elle Fanning deftly brings out all three qualities in the lead role, Jesse.) It’s about how people can be affected by them, and how hard it can be to distinguish those whose reactions are benign and those become more predatory. A little heavy on the English-lit homework angle? Maybe, but I loved it. Continue Reading